Close
Home
MenuSearch
X

Pet Wellness Month | Member Insight

Oct 1, 2021, 10:19 AM by ACVIM

 

It’s National Pet Wellness Month! Throughout October, we’ll be featuring ACVIM members and sharing their insights into the connection between regular pet wellness exams with primary care veterinarians and their role as veterinary specialists. 


Marios Charalambous, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (Neurology)

What connections have you seen between regular wellness exams with primary care veterinarians and your role as a veterinary specialist?

"Primary vets are one of the most important factors for allowing the public to reach us. Without the valuable contribution and referral of cases from the primary veterinarians, it would be quite hard to offer our focused services to animals that need access to specialty care."

How is specialty veterinary medicine paving the way for advances in veterinary science?

"Being a specialist offers to an individual the opportunity to see rare cases and then describe and report as well as study new or rare disorders. In addition to this, by conducting high quality research studies, specialists can introduce new paths for treating animals and enhancing veterinary science."



Jessica Romine, DVM, DACVIM (SAIM)

What connections have you seen between regular wellness exams with primary care veterinarians and your role as a veterinary specialist?

"Trends are so important. Being able to look through a patient's records and see their weight trending down, or their ALT slowly creeping up, etc. can be invaluable, and these changes allow for detection before an animal is in a critical state. And in our best case scenario, my role as an internist is temporary or limited, and care can be transitioned back to a primary care provider who is attentive to management!"

Share a story from a time that you worked closely with a general practitioner after a pet wellness exam to identify a more serious condition allowing you to save or prolong the animal's life with specialty veterinary treatment.

"A young Golden Retriever was referred by his primary veterinarian for asymptomatic but progressive anemia. It was picked up on a wellness exam, and at that time his owner reported he was absolutely fine and an "easy keeper" with no concerns for weight loss or other clinical signs. His veterinarian encouraged a recheck and when the anemia continued to trend slowly down without regeneration, sent him to us. We were able to diagnose thyroiditis with thyroglobulin antibodies and get him started on treatment; his anemia resolved and his energy levels shot through the roof - the owner didn't realize his low energy was actually a symptom and not a personality trait! He then transitioned care back to his primary vet for long term hypothyroid treatment and continues to do very well!"

How is specialty veterinary medicine paving the way for advances in veterinary science?

"Specialty medicine is where research meets practice for the first time, and techniques and therapeutics get honed. New drugs, new approaches to case management, new diagnostics, etc. usually filter through specialists first, and specialists are able to identify practical needs while applying their deep understanding of pathophysiology."  

 


 

Bill Tyrrell, DVM, DACVIM (Cardiology)

What connections have you seen between regular wellness exams with primary care veterinarians and your role as a veterinary specialist?

"Early detection of disease is paramount. Annual, if not biannual visits to the primary veterinarian are indicated for any age animal. The ability to diagnose disease early in its process enables us to do much more for the animal ultimately extending the pet's longevity."

Share a story from a time that you worked closely with a general practitioner after a pet wellness exam to identify a more serious condition allowing you to save or prolong the animal's life with specialty veterinary treatment.

"We work every day with primary care veterinarians that have found a new murmur or arrhythmia on a cat or dog at their annual examination. This early detection allows us as cardiologists to diagnose the cause and institute treatment early in the heart disease process to help the dog or cat live a longer and high quality life."

Back To Top